Jul
25
Fri
Lincoln Center Out of Doors @ Hearst Plaza, Lincoln Center; New York, NY
Jul 25 @ 6:00 PM

john luther adams silaJohn Luther Adams - Sila: The Breath of the World

Composer: John Luther Adams
Musical Director: Doug Perkins
Choreography: Mark DeChiazza
Featuring members of ContemporaneousThe Crossing, eighth blackbirdFace the Music, Grand Valley State University New Music Ensemble, JACK Quartet, Meehan/Perkins DuoStony Brook Contemporary Chamber Players, and TIGUE

 

In a co-presentation with Lincoln Center Out of Doors, the 2014 summer festivities begin with the world premiere of American composer John Luther Adams’s Sila: The Breath of the World. In the Inuit tradition, silais the spirit that animates all things—the wind, the weather, and all forces of nature. In Adams’s piece, composed specifically to be heard out of doors, musicians and listeners alike are encouraged to move about the perfromance space freely.

Words from the composer:

“Songs are thoughts which are sung out with the breath when people let themselves be moved by a great force…”
—Orpingalik, a Netsilik elder

In Inuit tradition the spirit that animates all things is sila, the breath of the world. Sila is the wind and the weather, the forces of nature. But it’s also something more. Sila is intelligence. It’s consciousness. It’s our awareness of the world around us, and the world’s awareness of us.

Over the past four decades, most of my music has been inspired by the outdoors, but heard indoors. With Inuksuit—for nine to 99 percussionists—I finally composed music intended from the start to be performed and heard outdoors. In Sila: The Breath of the World, I continue this exploration with a more orchestral instrumental palette.

Listening to music indoors, we usually try to ignore the outside world, focusing our listening on a limited range of sounds. Listening outdoors, we’re challenged to expand our attention to encompass a multiplicity of sounds. We’re invited to receive messages not only from the composer and the performers, but also from the larger world around us.

In Sila the musicians are dispersed widely throughout a large performance space. Listeners, too, are free to move around and discover their own individual listening points. Listening carefully to the counterpoint between the composed music of Sila and the never-ending music of the performance site, we transform seemingly empty space into a more fully experienced place.

Sila is intended for performance outdoors by 16 to 80 musicians, or more. The performance materials include scores and parts for five different ensembles of woodwinds, brass, percussion, strings, and voices. These five ensembles may perform Sila in any combination, successively or simultaneously, in the same space or separate spaces. At Lincoln Center Out of Doors, and as part of the Mostly Mozart Festival, we will present the full orchestral version of the piece.

Sila comes out of the earth and rises to the sky. The piece traverses 16 harmonic clouds, grounded on the first 16 harmonics of a low B-flat. All the other tones in the music fall “between the cracks” of the piano keyboard—off the grid of 12-tone equal temperament.

Like the tuning, the flow of musical time in Sila is also off the grid. There is no conductor. Each musician is a soloist who plays or sings a unique part at her or his own pace. The sequence of musical events is composed, but the length of each event is flexible. The music breathes.

A performance of Sila lasts approximately 70 minutes. There is no clearly demarcated ending. As the music of the performance gradually dissolves into the larger sonic landscape, the musicians join the audience in listening to the continuing music of the place.

—John Luther Adams

Lincoln Center Out of Doors @ Damrosch Park Bandshell, Lincoln Center; New York, NY
Jul 25 @ 7:30 PM

Pam Tanowitz Dance
PASSAGEN 
featuring Pauline Kim Harris
The Spectators (excerpt) 
featuring FLUX Quartet

Freedom teases form and the graceful traditions of ballet and modern dance fracture in gorgeous, post–modern moments, set to contemporary scores performed live. The onstage vitality of violinist Harris, playing John Zorn’s PASSAGEN, and FLUX Quartet, performing Annie Gosfield’s score, as well as recorded music by composer Dan Siegler, augment witty excerpts from Tanowitz’s acclaimed The Spectators.

eighth blackbird
Erase
 by Andy Akiho (New York Premiere)
Murder Ballades
 by Bryce Dessner (New York Premiere)
Counting Duets
 by Tom Johnson/Études by György Ligeti
these broken wings 3
 by David Lang

This exuberant, triple Grammy–winning contemporary classical sextet tackles a wide-ranging program, including N.Y. premieres by forward-looking young composers (Dessner of The National/Clogs, steel pan innovator Akiho) and contemporary masters (Bang on a Can’s Lang, the influential Ligeti).

Jul
26
Sat
Lincoln Center Out of Doors @ Hearst Plaza, Lincoln Center; New York, NY
Jul 26 @ 6:00 PM

john luther adams silaJohn Luther Adams - Sila: The Breath of the World

Composer: John Luther Adams
Musical Director: Doug Perkins
Choreography: Mark DeChiazza
Featuring members of ContemporaneousThe Crossing, eighth blackbirdFace the Music, Grand Valley State University New Music Ensemble, JACK Quartet, Meehan/Perkins DuoStony Brook Contemporary Chamber Players, and TIGUE

 

In a co-presentation with Lincoln Center Out of Doors, the 2014 summer festivities begin with the world premiere of American composer John Luther Adams’s Sila: The Breath of the World. In the Inuit tradition, silais the spirit that animates all things—the wind, the weather, and all forces of nature. In Adams’s piece, composed specifically to be heard out of doors, musicians and listeners alike are encouraged to move about the perfromance space freely.

Words from the composer:

“Songs are thoughts which are sung out with the breath when people let themselves be moved by a great force…”
—Orpingalik, a Netsilik elder

In Inuit tradition the spirit that animates all things is sila, the breath of the world. Sila is the wind and the weather, the forces of nature. But it’s also something more. Sila is intelligence. It’s consciousness. It’s our awareness of the world around us, and the world’s awareness of us.

Over the past four decades, most of my music has been inspired by the outdoors, but heard indoors. With Inuksuit—for nine to 99 percussionists—I finally composed music intended from the start to be performed and heard outdoors. In Sila: The Breath of the World, I continue this exploration with a more orchestral instrumental palette.

Listening to music indoors, we usually try to ignore the outside world, focusing our listening on a limited range of sounds. Listening outdoors, we’re challenged to expand our attention to encompass a multiplicity of sounds. We’re invited to receive messages not only from the composer and the performers, but also from the larger world around us.

In Sila the musicians are dispersed widely throughout a large performance space. Listeners, too, are free to move around and discover their own individual listening points. Listening carefully to the counterpoint between the composed music of Sila and the never-ending music of the performance site, we transform seemingly empty space into a more fully experienced place.

Sila is intended for performance outdoors by 16 to 80 musicians, or more. The performance materials include scores and parts for five different ensembles of woodwinds, brass, percussion, strings, and voices. These five ensembles may perform Sila in any combination, successively or simultaneously, in the same space or separate spaces. At Lincoln Center Out of Doors, and as part of the Mostly Mozart Festival, we will present the full orchestral version of the piece.

Sila comes out of the earth and rises to the sky. The piece traverses 16 harmonic clouds, grounded on the first 16 harmonics of a low B-flat. All the other tones in the music fall “between the cracks” of the piano keyboard—off the grid of 12-tone equal temperament.

Like the tuning, the flow of musical time in Sila is also off the grid. There is no conductor. Each musician is a soloist who plays or sings a unique part at her or his own pace. The sequence of musical events is composed, but the length of each event is flexible. The music breathes.

A performance of Sila lasts approximately 70 minutes. There is no clearly demarcated ending. As the music of the performance gradually dissolves into the larger sonic landscape, the musicians join the audience in listening to the continuing music of the place.

—John Luther Adams

Sep
12
Fri
Heart & Breath @ Museum of Contemporary Art, Chicago, IL
Sep 12 @ 7:30 PM

Repertoire
Amy Beth Kirsten Colombine’s Paradise Theatre (2013)
Richard Reed Parry Duo for Heart and Breath (2012)
Bon Iver, arr. Kaplan Babys (2009/13)
Claudio Monteverdi, arr. Munro Lamento della Ninfa (1638/2013)
Carlo Gesulado, arr. Munro Moro, lasso al mio duolo (1611/2013)

Sep
18
Thu
Heart & Breath @ Miller Theatre at Columbia University, New York, NY
Sep 18 @ 8:00 PM

Repertoire
Amy Beth Kirsten Colombine’s Paradise Theatre (2013) New York premiere
Richard Reed Parry Duo for Heart and Breath (2012)
Bon Iver, arr. Kaplan Babys (2009/13) New York premiere
Claudio Monteverdi, arr. Munro Lamento della Ninfa (1638/2013) New York premiere
Carlo Gesulado, arr. Munro Moro, lasso al mio duolo (1611/2013) New York premiere

Sep
22
Mon
Pattycake @ Camp Concert Hall, Booker Hall of Music, Richmond, VA
Sep 22 @ 7:30 PM

PROGRAM:
György Ligeti: Études (arr. 2014)
Tom Johnson: Counting Duets (2014)
Lee Hyla: Wave (2012)
Sean Griffin: Pattycake (2007)
Gabriella Smith: Number Nine (2013)
David Little: and the sky was still there (2010)

Oct
10
Fri
Matt Ulery’s In the Ivory, featuring eighth blackbird @ Constellation, Chicago, IL
Oct 10 @ 9:30 PM

Event is 21+.

Performers:

Matt Ulery – double bass and compositions
Rob Clearfield – piano
Jon Deitemyer – drums
Andrew McCann – violin
Dominic Johnson – viola
Yvonne Lam – violin (of eighth blackbird)
Nick Photinos – cello (of eighth blackbird)
Tim Munro – alto flute (of eighth blackbird)
Michael Maccaferri – clarinet (of eighth blackbird)
Lisa Kaplan – piano (of eighth blackbird)
Matthew Duvall – vibraphone and marimba (of eighth blackbird)

Oct
16
Thu
Murder Ballades @ Peter Jay Sharp Building, Brooklyn Academy of Music Gilman Opera House, New York, NY
Oct 16 @ 7:30 PM

eighth blackbird will be performing Bryce Dessner’s Murder Ballades as a live music accompaniment for a performance by the L.A. Dance Project. The full program is as follows:

Reflections (2013)
Choreography by Benjamin Millepied in collaboration with the company
Music by David Lang
Visual concept by Barbara Kruger

Murder Ballades (2013)
Choreography by Justin Peck
Music by Bryce Dessner
Visual concept by Sterling Ruby

Quintett (1993)
Choreography by William Forsythe
Music by Gavin Bryars

Oct
17
Fri
Murder Ballades @ Peter Jay Sharp Building, Brooklyn Academy of Music Gilman Opera House, New York, NY
Oct 17 @ 7:30 PM

eighth blackbird will be performing Bryce Dessner’s Murder Ballades as a live music accompaniment for a performance by the L.A. Dance Project. The full program is as follows:

Reflections (2013)
Choreography by Benjamin Millepied in collaboration with the company
Music by David Lang
Visual concept by Barbara Kruger

Murder Ballades (2013)
Choreography by Justin Peck
Music by Bryce Dessner
Visual concept by Sterling Ruby

Quintett (1993)
Choreography by William Forsythe
Music by Gavin Bryars

Oct
18
Sat
Murder Ballades @ Peter Jay Sharp Building, Brooklyn Academy of Music Gilman Opera House, New York, NY
Oct 18 @ 7:30 PM

eighth blackbird will be performing Bryce Dessner’s Murder Ballades as a live music accompaniment for a performance by the L.A. Dance Project. The full program is as follows:

Reflections (2013)
Choreography by Benjamin Millepied in collaboration with the company
Music by David Lang
Visual concept by Barbara Kruger

Murder Ballades (2013)
Choreography by Justin Peck
Music by Bryce Dessner
Visual concept by Sterling Ruby

Quintett (1993)
Choreography by William Forsythe
Music by Gavin Bryars