3P 2018 feat. Pamela Z

It’s that time of year again. You know, when you kick what’s left of your crumpled Halloween costume from the middle of your bedroom floor to a dark corner of your hallway closet and treat your sugar hangover to five concerts of electroacoustic music…

…And what a treat it was this year! I was struck by how many firsts I encountered. I can’t say whether they were actual firsts for the festival, but they were first for me in my memory of the festival for the past 7 years. I’ll just go in order of experience:

  1. Melodica trio. Chris Chandler’s cicada song featured not one but three melodicas. And they were in tune. Oh, and the piece was remarkably beautiful.
  2. Haystack. Mike Frengel brought his own haystack with him as a prop for his electric guitar piece Country Roads, which was a kind of wild one-man country jam band improv session. You gotta admire the attention to authenticity.
  3. Player piano. Okay, maybe this isn’t a first, but it’s the first time in my memory, which is admittedly fallible. Clifton Callender wrote a series of Infinite Canons for player piano which have some kind of nerdy process I won’t go into here, but suffice to say they aren’t playable by any human (or at least by any one human at a time) and are extremely delightful.
  4. Belly dancer.  Aurie Hsu and Steven Kemper developed  a wireless sensor interface for belly dance. It was as amazing as you think.
  5. Candles. I don’t know how the festival got around the building’s smoke detectors, but this piece for candles and myaku, which translates the intensity variance of light into sound waves, was mesmerizing. It was like attending a techy meditation/seance.
  6. Pamela Z. The second half of the last concert was dedicated to Pamela Z’s works, which she performed to great effect. I’ve seen almost all of them before, but never with the accompanying video. Pamela is an electrifying performer (no pun intended) and her works don’t get old. Syrinx, in which she slows down a bird song to the point where she can replicate it, then speeds up her version to mimic the original, is a favorite of mine. We are so excited to be commissioning her and premiering it in June at the LA Phil Noon to Midnight series. More on that later…

In addition to these firsts, our very own Nathalie Joachim played an excerpt from her project Fanm d’Ayiti, and Nick Photinos played works by Mark Snyder and 2018 Lab Fellow Gemma Peacocke. 

Another highlight of the festival for me was the mini synth building workshop led by Douglas Geers. I barely understand how a light switch works, so I was intrigued by the possibility of learning how to build my own square wave synthesizer in two hours. Among other things, I learned that a clarinet only sounds odd overtones, which not only explains its singular sound but also why they’re impossible to tune with. Douglas is an inordinately patient teacher armed with great instructions, slides and pictures, and a lot of infectious enthusiasm. At the end of two hours, I had an adorable mini wooden suitcase that goes beep boop to take home for my son to destroy, and a (very) rudimentary understanding of what a square wave is, how breadboards work, and (hopefully) how not to electrocute yourself. 

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