Eugene Symphony

Last week in Eugene was jam-packed. I mean, in four days we did a concert at a retirement center, a concert at a medical center, an NAACP event, two youth concerts for 2800 third to fifth-graders, a chamber music masterclass, a seminar for composers, a concert at a high school, a flute masterclass, AND a performance of On a Wire with the Eugene Symphony. I gotta hand it to them, when they say community engagement, they mean it. 

But it was all really delightful. I especially loved the youth concerts, because the energy and enthusiasm of kids is so infectious – you can’t help but feel the same way no matter how tired you are. We taught them the first counting sequence of one of Tom Johnson’s Counting Duets, and I challenge anyone not to smile when you hear how excited kids are to scream the number 10. And when you see those kids outside afterwards and one of them spontaneously hugs you, it’s all over. I almost took that kid home with me.

We played for a much more intimate gathering of band and choir students at a local high school, and their enthusiasm was no less intense. In fact, they had listened to our recordings and watched some videos, so the pump was primed for them to see us in person. They had all sorts of questions and were so palpably engaged in our performance. If only audience members were that psyched all the time.

Finally, on our last evening, we performed with the Eugene Symphony. But not before making at least two videos of in-the-piano demos for social media, one done by Maestro Lecce-Chong himself, who could give any E! host a run for his money. The Hult Center performance hall is enormous, with a ceiling design that makes you feel like you’re inside a woven basket. Despite the small Eugene population, the hall was pretty full. We met a lot of the audience during intermission. They’re the kind of people who aren’t shy to come up to you and just talk (I had a long-ish conversation with one woman about breastfeeding!), which is what’s so great about small towns. I also got to meet the parents of original Eighth Blackbird flutist Molly Barth, who until recently was teaching at the University of Oregon. Her parents moved to Eugene to be near her, but she has just left them to teach at Vanderbilt, which they say they’re fine with. 

Now we’re back in chilly Chicago, which greeted us with mountains of fallen leaves and some of the first snowfall of the year. I’m going to get my Amish turkey today and hopefully get rid of my rotten Halloween pumpkin as well before the extended family descends upon our home for the week. Happy Thanksgiving, everyone!

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